Re: [Fwd: LOGO-L> Papert and the Internet]

Dale R. Reed (dale-reed@postoffice.worldnet.att.net)
Wed, 05 Mar 1997 09:05:56 -0800

Anne Evans wrote:
>
> Dale
> One of the reasons I post very little to this board is your rudeness -
> intellectual challenge is one thing - rudeness is another.
> To elucidate: on aol - you violate their rules for acceptable use and
> they dump you.

So now I understand. It was not your school's rules but your system
provider AOL's rules that were violated by the students. That makes the
rest of the my posting "rude" I suppose but in truth I just did not
understand what you talking about. My mistake was ASSUMING that I knew
what you were talking about(even though I clearly said in my message I
did not) and continued responding assuming you were talking about your
school's rules.

I have never used AOL or whatever so have no experience with them. It
appears that from your post they censor. I had never heard of that
before but it is interesting that they are reading their user's mail. I
don't think ATT or MSN does that.
<snip>
> They had other options - use a different service provider for example.

Right.

> If a student is on line, feels uncomfortable with something going on,
> naturally I will respond - not by closing down the service or
> censoring what is happening, but by explaining what is going on and
> MAKING SURE THE CHILD UNDERSTANDS THAT S/HE DOES NOT NEED TO RESPOND.

Sounds like a reasonable thing to do. Would be a good policy no matter
whether the provider censors or not. I would call it "teaching
responsibility" but I guess we do not want to open that can of worms
again do we.

> I welcome intellectual exchange of ideas but superiority and plain old
> rudeness I do not welcome. I hope that we will have more collegial
> contact in the future,

I certainly hope so Anne.

But now that Anne's posting is clarified(and hopefully I will not be
judged rude for being kinda slow) that broadens the discussion some for
the actions of the individuals at the student directed school can
certainly get the school in trouble and as Anne says the students are
sensitive to that fact.

It would be interesting to compare the lengths(and details) of the lists
of rules and regulations at student directed schools and non student
directed schools. Often individuals are harder on themselves(partially
because they know what they are thinking about doing while the
authorities cannot not imagine what they are thinking) than external
authorities are. It could very well be that democratic schools just
like some "democratic" societies are less free than examples from other
alternatives.
But I guess that is a new thread. Dale