Re: Working for love.

Paul Gilbert (Paul.Gilbert@mci.com)
Wed, 01 Apr 1998 17:33 -0700 (MST)

Thanks, Alan. Yes, that's what I had in mind. Governments are engaging
in unfair competition. It takes courage to do something
unconventional, like sending your child to a Subury-style school. In
addition, you pay the full cost of your child's education. Then you
are forced to pay taxes during your entire adult life to support an
expensive government-run school system. With government soaking up
such a large share of education dollars available, it isn't surprising
that alternative schools are on a tight budget. Fortunately, some
flowers bloom in the desert.

Paul Gilbert

Date: Wed, 01 Apr 1998 14:57 -0700 (MST)
From: KleinCon <KleinCon@aol.com>
To: discuss-sudbury-model@sudval.org
Subject: Re: Working for love.

In a message dated 98-04-01 16:50:50 EST, Charles wrote:

<< On Wed, 1 Apr 1998, Paul Gilbert wrote:

>
> 2. I would hope people involved with Sudbury-style school would be
> acutely aware of the root of the pay problem: the
> government-dominated school system.

If public schools disappear then teachers (staff, adult co-learners,
whatever) won't need money to live on? >>

I believe what Paul is referring to is the fact that those of us who choose to
send our kids to private schools pay twice for education - once in taxes to
support a space our child is not occupying, an done in tuition to support the
space they are occupying. If we could have the tax money follow the kid, in
the form of vouchers or whatever, then there would be a much larger pool for
private schools to draw on to pay teachers.

Alan